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Thu 02 Feb 11:30: Development and application of environmental flow software

feed://www.talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/29538 - Fri, 27/01/2023 - 09:32
Development and application of environmental flow software

Software that calculates parameterised solutions to the equations that govern atmospheric flow, dispersion and chemistry processes can be used to investigate relatively complex real-world air flow and air pollution problems. Examples of applications of Cambridge Environmental Research Consultants (CERC) software will be discussed, ranging from the study of disruptive wind shear at Hong Kong international airport, to the quantification of hazardous chemicals generated as a bi-product of carbon capture and storage processes.

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Categories: News (<front>)

Thu 26 Jan 16:30: Nuclear Energy for Climate Tea and cakes to be available from 16:15

feed://www.talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/29538 - Wed, 25/01/2023 - 17:31
Nuclear Energy for Climate

Join us for a panel discussion to hear more about nuclear advocacy and how you can participate in order to make a difference.

Panelists:

Hannah Fenwick (Nuclear for Climate COP27 , National Nuclear Laboratory) and Dominic Brennan (Nuclear Energy Group, University of Cambridge)

Tea and cakes to be available from 16:15

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Categories: News (<front>)

Thu 26 Jan 11:30: Modelling electrode heterogeneity in lithium-ion batteries

feed://www.talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/29538 - Fri, 20/01/2023 - 08:49
Modelling electrode heterogeneity in lithium-ion batteries

Lithium-ion batteries have become ubiquitous in consumer electronics, and more recently electric vehicles, due to their high energy density, long lifespan, and a low self-discharge rate. Their increasing demand necessitates design improvements in performance and reliability, which in turn requires accurate models of how they work. In mathematical models, the highly heterogeneous porous electrodes are usually approximated as comprising spherical particles of one size, leading to the so-called “single-particle model”. In this talk, we first extend this model to account for a distribution of particle sizes. We discuss its effects and the methods of reduction to an effective single particle, e.g. via averaging or asymptotic methods. Then, this model is further extended to include the electrolyte dynamics via a multiscale “pseudo-3D” approach, which we show can capture some basic behaviours of a battery seen in experiments (such as its rest period immediately after a (dis)charge) that were previously unexplained. The numerical models have been incorporated into the open source battery modelling software package PyBaMM, to enhance their usability and reproducibility.

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Thu 19 Jan 16:30: Innovation in Nuclear Energy

feed://www.talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/29538 - Thu, 19/01/2023 - 11:19
Innovation in Nuclear Energy

Our Panel of speakers will be talking about their companies, their technologies and the opportunities available to Nuclear start-ups. Join our panel of speakers for an informative and enjoyable discussion. Carol Tansley (Vice President UK New Build Project, X-Energy) Michael Drury (Managing Director, UK Atomics) Sander de Groot (Co-Founder, Thorizon) Join us for this informative session. Tea and cakes will be available from 16:15

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Thu 19 Jan 16:30: Innovation in Nuclear Energy

feed://www.talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/29538 - Thu, 19/01/2023 - 09:04
Innovation in Nuclear Energy

Our Panel of speakers will be talking about their companies, their technologies and the opportunities available to Nuclear start-ups. Join our panel of speakers for an informative and enjoyable discussion. Carol Tansley (Vice President UK New Build Project, X-Energy) Michael Drury (UK Atomics) Sander de Groot (Co-Founder, Thorizon) Join us for this informative session. Tea and cakes will be available from 16:15

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Thu 16 Mar 11:30: Planning and Economic Studies Section of the IAEA

feed://www.talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/29538 - Wed, 18/01/2023 - 11:55
Planning and Economic Studies Section of the IAEA

Small Modular Reactors (SMR) have unique design, safety and economic features that make them attractive to potential project developers and end-users but also investors, governments, and communities worldwide. The technology can be applied to produce low-carbon electricity, heat (for district heating, for example), hydrogen and desalinated water, in addition to grid, load-following and ancillary services. More than 80 SMR designs and concepts are currently under development and have varying degrees of readiness levels. For each of these projects, development costs need to be understood, as well as construction and operation expenses, which still need to be appropriately estimated, analysed and optimised. Specific revenue models are also needed for demonstrating the business case and secure access to funding, financing, and low cost of capital for the promoters of the technology. Finally, the macroeconomic impact associated with SMR development, manufacturing, construction and operation has to be quantified and communicated to gain the support of the government and society at large.

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Thu 19 Jan 11:30: Leidenfrost temperature(s)

feed://www.talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/29538 - Wed, 18/01/2023 - 11:37
Leidenfrost temperature(s)

When deposited on a hot solid, volatile liquids can levitate on a cushion of their own vapour, without liquid-solid contact, a phenomenon called the Leidenfrost effect. The presence of a vapour layer, that separates the liquid from the solid, has two crucial consequences for applications: (i) a dramatic reduction of heat transfer, and (ii) a reduced friction, making Leidenfrost drops extremely mobile. In this seminar, I will tackle a deceivingly simple question: what is the solid temperature necessary to observe levitation, the so-called Leidenfrost temperature. First, I will propose to understand the onset of the Leidenfrost effect as emerging from the ability of the vapour layer to levitate the liquid, through the example of drop impact on superheated substrates. I will then show the limitations of this approach, and propose a different definition of the Leidenfrost temperature as the critical point of a second order phase transition, by making an analogy with non-equilibrium systems exhibiting a directed percolation phase transition. In this framework, the Leidenfrost temperature does not stem from the hydrodynamic ability of the vapour layer to support the liquid, but it expresses the resilience of Leidenfrost drops to contact. Finally, I will discuss the implications of this new definition of the Leidenfrost temperature on heat transfer in drop impact situations.

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Mon 06 Mar 19:30: The adolescent brain

feed://www.talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/29538 - Tue, 17/01/2023 - 17:18
The adolescent brain

Adolescence, defined as 10-24 years, is a period of life often characterised by behaviours that can appear, prima facie, irrational such as dangerous risk-taking and impulsivity. However, these behaviours can be interpreted as adaptive and rational given that a key developmental goal of this period of life is to mature into an independent adult while navigating a social world that is unstable and changing. Research over the past two decades has demonstrated that social cognitive processes involved in navigating an increasingly complex social world develop, social influence is an important determinant of decision making and areas of the social brain undergo substantial development across adolescence. The findings suggest that adolescence might be a sensitive period of social development.

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Mon 06 Feb 19:30: Advanced Raman Spectroscopy and Emerging Applications

feed://www.talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/29538 - Tue, 17/01/2023 - 17:11
Advanced Raman Spectroscopy and Emerging Applications

The non-invasive compositional analysis of diffusely scattering (turbid) samples such as powders, opaque bottles or biological tissues, at depth is a fast evolving area of Raman spectroscopy spurred by the recent advent of Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS). Accessible depths with SORS can be more than an order of magnitude larger than those attainable with conventional Raman spectroscopy enabling, for example, non-invasive interrogation several mm’s, and in some cases several cm’s, deep inside biological tissues. This presentation will focus on the development of SORS , its basic principles and discuss new application areas it is opening, including the detection of explosives in airport security, quality control of pharmaceutical products, subsurface analysis of objects of art and non-invasive cancer and bone disease diagnoses.

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Mon 23 Jan 19:30: Feeding Britain: should this rich country feed itself more or rely on others’ land and labour?

feed://www.talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/29538 - Tue, 17/01/2023 - 17:10
Feeding Britain: should this rich country feed itself more or rely on others’ land and labour?

The lecture will explore the state of UK food security and ask whether it should be growing more food or continue to rely heavily on imports. The UK Food Security Report (Dec 2021) painted a picture which could either reassure or concern us. The UK is heavily import dependent. Home production has slowly fallen since the 1980s. It provides c.54% of what is consumed. There is a c.£25bn annual food trade deficit. Nearly a fifth of its population report being food insecure. The Cost of Living crisis means food is squeezed, hitting not just people on low incomes. Diet is already a major driver of ill-health and environmental damage. Why is this situation being accepted? Is it being normalized? Food receives little political attention, compared to energy costs. As a rich economy, is the UK being quietly taken back into a quasi-imperial situation where it will buy food from where land and labour are cheaper? Does this matter? If we wanted to grow more food, how could this be delivered? For what purpose? What are the blockages? With the Russian invasion of Ukraine reminding us how dependent food is on fossil-fuels, is time for a big rethink? The London Government sidelined the July 2021 Dimbleby report but might events make this change? Is the the public interest being left to Tesco et al?

Book here for in-person attendance (free for CSAR full members; £5 for others). Book here for Zoom viewing.

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Categories: News (<front>)

Thu 16 Feb 11:30: TBC

feed://www.talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/29538 - Tue, 17/01/2023 - 11:14
TBC

Abstract not available

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Thu 16 Feb 11:30: TBC

feed://www.talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/29538 - Tue, 17/01/2023 - 11:14
TBC

Abstract not available

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Cambridge Real Time Weather Data